Entries in Hiraki Sawa (1)

Saturday
Feb262011

Chelsea Art Walk II

Back in November I did a writeup of an art walk in Chelsea, NY that highlighted some artwork that might be of interest to those with a SFnal outlook. Well, having been back on a blue-skied winter's day today, I've found a couple more that might be intriguing.

Donovan InstallationDonovan DrawingFirst is a wonderful show at the Pace Gallery by Tara Donovan, an artist who's working here exclusively in nickel headed steel pins on white polystyrene board. The images she produces are reminiscent of crystalline patterns, galaxies, or globular clusters, shimmering silver. They have to be seen up close, because along with the beautiful surface patterns, she also works with a delightful density of heights, building up bulges, hillocks and little forests of pins. They are works in which to lose oneself.

Another interesting show is an installation titled "O" by London-based video artist Hiraki Sawa, at the James Cohan Gallery. It's also the gallery for Bill Viola, which isn't a surprise because Sawa's metaphysically intriguing, digitally manipulated images are reminiscent of Viola.Sawa "O" This is a show about time and the metaphor of the circle or spinning image. He imposes video of a toy ferris wheel, the moon, and flying (migrating?) birds on interior or exterior landscapes. Meanwhile smaller video images of spinning objects like a top, a bell and a lightbulb dot the darkened space. Sawa has also added an atmospheric musical drone to the piece, that plays here and there on small, spinning speakers.

Sawa also has a series of large, precise, gorgeously drafted pencil drawings of different phases of the moon, to go with the videos.

A third piece is the glorious "Recitative" by Jennifer Bartlett at Pace. It's a quasi-minimalist piece, something of an update to her earlier masterpiece "Rhapsody". (Which is also available in book form). Like that work, it's all about color, form and rhythm, though without any representational qualities. It has an expansiveness that suggests a universe of possibility. Unfortunately the show closes today, and also unfortunately it's a piece that is so huge as to be virtually impossible to show photographically. It stretches around three walls of an enormous interior gallery space. I include three images of it, to give the flavor. (Click for larger images).

Bartlett: Recitative (beginning)Bartlett: Recitative (middle)Bartlett: Recitative (end)Last I heard the piece remained unsold. I expect the only potential buyers would be either very wealthy patrons with enormous interior spaces or more likely museums. I only hope it ends up at a good home.